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TappIn Beats Dropbox

With so many options for storage of your files, it’s nice to know that you can depend on TappIn to come out on top. We believe that’s because TappIn is unique and offers its users more advantages and security than other available options. But you don’t have to take our word for it, just read PCWorld’s review of TappIn.

Here are some quick snippets from the review that showcase why TappIn is better than some other options, such as Dropbox:

“TappIn works slightly differently from remote access storage services like Dropbox. With Dropbox, you are buying storage space on the company’s server and allowing others to access your files and folders there. With TappIn, you allow the app to retrieve your data from a designated folder, encrypt it, and send it to another computer or mobile device. TappIn is less expensive than Dropbox, because you are not paying for storage space, and it’s faster, because you don’t have to upload files.”

I know you’re thinking, “of course, TappIn has the advantage because I’m storing my files locally and not on some mysterious cloud server, but did the reviewer comment on how easy it was to safely share my files?” Yes, the reviewer addresses that wonderfully:

“It was easy to set up and use TappIn. After you sign up for an account, you browse through your files and folders and designate which ones you want to give access to. Then you enter the emails of the people to whom you want to give that access, along with a customizable message letting them know that the files are available. The sharer can require those they share with to log in to TappIn with their own ID and password or they can allow others to see the files without logging in. It would seem to be a no-brainer to require the recipients to log in with a password to keep privacy to a maximum, given how many emails get hacked these days.”

So what did they leave out? Why do you think TappIn is better than other cloud storage services? We want to hear from you! Respond to the review or this blog post. It’s 2012, if that Mayan calendar is right, you’ll be glad you supported TappIn and kept your files where you could find them.