Tag Archives: Best Jobs

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Did We Mention That We Love Working Here?

Well it’s not only our opinion, now it is a matter-of-fact. GlobalSCAPE, TappIn’s parent company, was just announced that for the second year in a row it was named to Texas Monthly Magazine’s 2012 list of “Best Companies to Work for in Texas”.

Over the past year, GlobalSCAPE has been named a top place to work by three other sources: the San Antonio Express-News, the San Antonio Business Journal, and Computerworld Magazine.

Here in Seattle, we’ve experienced the same first class treatment. The GlobalSCAPE team has been great to us and we’re excited to be a part of the family.

While winning such awards as these are truly an honor and make us thankful for our place of work, it sparked a great blogging opportunity to look at some of the less fortunate jobs in years past…

In The Dark Ages you may have had this job:

The Guillemot Egg Collector: 
Farming could be unpredictable and food scarce, so guillemot eggs were an important source of protein in the Saxon peasant’s diet. The only trouble being that guillemots nest on ledges, precariously balanced on cliff sides, so collecting them meant risking life and limb hundreds of feet above jagged rocks and raging seas. And if this wasn’t dangerous enough, angry birds were likely to attack anyone trying to steal their precious eggs.” Found on the Discovery Channel online.

If you lived in The Middle Ages you could have had this occupation:

The Leech Collector: These poor unfortunates collected leeches – used for medicinal bloodletting – by wading into marshes and letting the little bloodsuckers cling to their legs. One leech is uncomfortable; imagine pulling a whole bucketful off your body! The wounds often became infected and bacteria from the leeches could cause nasty stomach upsets.” Found on the Discovery Channel online.

And finally, in the Georgian Era you could have had this job:

The Mule Scavenger: Georgian mill owners cared about profits and not about the lives of their workers – and the mule scavenger probably had the worst job in the mill. They were child apprentices, as young as eight, often from the local workhouse. They got board, lodgings and pocket money to crawl around under the ‘mules’ (weaving machines) and collect fluff and cotton. The mills were hot, humid and very noisy and mule scavengers worked 12 to 14 hours at a time, with no proper meal breaks. Concentration was everything, as they had to move with the rhythm of the ‘mule’. One slip and they could lose a finger, a hand or even their life, as they were crushed in the heavy machinery.” Found on the Discovery Channel online.

…Yeah, we’re definitely thankful for TappIn and GlobalSCAPE!